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20131202
20131210
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KQED (PBS) 33
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English 33
Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)
for the economy is finally good news for wall street. stocks rose sharply because of a super strong jobs report. american businesses added 2,300 jobs in november, much more than expected, and the nation's unemployment rate fell to 7% even, that's a five-year low. the rally was broad base with all ten sectors of the s&p 500 index on the plus side. today's gains come after five straight losing sessions on fears that a stronger economy would be the cat list for the federal reserve to cut back on the stimulus plan. now it looks like investors and traders believe a growing economy is good news. so here is a look at today's closing numbers. the dow shot up almost 200 points back above the 16,000 level. the nasdaq jumped about 30 and s&p rose 20 points returning to the 1800 mark again. >>> so where are all those jobs, and what do the gains mean for the economy? hampton pearson takes a look. >> just in time for the holidays, tanger outlets opened this 100 million dollar complex with 80 high-end retailers outside washington d.c. in light of today's surprisingly strong jobs report, opening a new outlet m
.com/nbr. >>> growing stronger, the u.s. economy grows at its fastest pace since early 2012, but is the 3.6% rate as strong as it appears? and why do american businesses still seem so hesitant? >> protests over pay. fast food workers strike in the biggest push yet for higher wages. they want $15 an hour. they average around $9 now. what a big raise would mean for businesses and consumers. >> and the sticker shock, why washington lawmakers could be the reason you pay more, lots more for milk. we have all that and more tonight on "nightly business report" for thursday, december 5th. >>> good evening everyone. stocks kept sliding today, the losses though modest marked the fifth day in a row of declines for the dow and s&p 500, the longest streak since september and the government shutdown. the indexes are less than 2% from the all-time highs. today's declines were driven by rekindled concerns the federal reserve may reduce the $85 billion a month in bond purr chases and might do it as soon as this month because economic news out today pointed to a strengthening of u.s. growth. the come he domestic p
. in washington, the week's other been on the economy, good news on the jobs front today, a healthcare website that and theinally working struggles that continue away capital.nation's starting with the jobs report, are we seeing the long-awaited recovery everyone is talking about or what, david? >> i think the economy is moving in the right direction, moving slowly but in the right direction. we've had two months with over 200,000 jobs added, the unemployment rate is as low as it's been in the last five years month wasring this across the economy -- manufacturing, construction, it's aate and local so good sign but it's important to remember there's still a lot of people out of work. than one third of the unemployed have been out of work for six months or more and hard time getting hired. gwen: that's one piece of today's news. week's newsof this is about the healthcare act. at the white house today, they are linking the good economic with the finally good news about the healthcare act. is there a connection between rebound in the economy and the healthcare act? >> the link is tha this law all
bach of positive reports on jobs, housing and the upbeat survey on the economy. the take away for investors, the fed will taper back stimulus plans and that might not be good for the markets. all this comes just two days before the release of the monthly jobs report. a key data point for central bank policy makers. it's no wonder stock averages between gains and losses and finally ending mostly in the red for the day. the dow lost 25 but down as much as 125 earlier in the day and the nasdaq edged up a fraction and s&p fell two points. the same concerns about the fed's next move sent the yield on the benchmark treasury note above 2.8%, the highest since september. >> how does the federal reserve see the economy right now as it prepares for the next policy meeting next month? steve liesman looks at the beige book survey and what that, along with this friday's november jobs report, could mean for the future of its stimulus program. >> reporter: some strong employment data today raising prospects for better job growth and less stimulus. adp in a much followed monthly report foreca
%. >> these changes are huge, for the american economy and the american people. >> for more on the battle over youamerican health care, do think that president obama made a persuasive case to the american public that health reform has happened? >> i think he was trying to focus on why it is important and what it means for a lot of people. he has done this before, of course, by saying that nobody should have to choose between putting food on the table and taking their kids to the doctor. it is a powerful argument. his probably most powerful argument was saying to the republicans, ok, you haven't liked it, but you don't have anything to put in its place. it will who have it, particularly those on medicaid, the health care for the poor, won't want it taken away from them. it still remains to see if people find the process so painful that they put it off. and if they don't like what they get, is it an improvement? >> my impression is that they are lead -- they are breeding something of a sigh of relief at the white house. they are alsout treating the patients so much so that they want them out of
in stock prices but in property markets, as well. he called the u.s. economy still weak and vulnerable. he says technology and financial sector stocks seem most stretched. he still sees value in energy and health care, so far this year the broad-based s&p 500 index is up more than 26%. >>> well, jim paulson is not buying the bubble talk, saying there is still a lot of upside in the market, jim, nice to have you with us. so tell us why you're not expecting any bubble trouble after a nobel prize winning economist says that things are vulnerable. >> you know, susie, i think the primary thing that creates sort of a bubble economy and ultimately a recession is just simply too much confidence about the future. when all the players, consumers, businesses, policy officials, everybody gets really bullish about the future they start to engage in dumb behaviors, they stretch the balance sheets, hire too many people and buy that second summer home and that is the thing that ultimately has to be corrected. and i think that confidence is better today but we're still at confidence levels that are below a
the larger part of the economy? >> if you have young people living with relatives and friends, couch surfing, renting instead of buying a home because they don't have the money to do that or the credit built up to do that or have bad credit, that pushes back the time line where they can buy a home and if they do it at all. it also had a big implication for consumer spend coming is the biggest part of our economy. if people are earning less over their lifetime they will be buying and consuming less. >> so everything gets pushed back down the line. >> exactly. >> i'm wondering if the way we thought about these jobs for young people that it's over. that these jobs have been taken by two or thee of these jobs to make up for a salary they had once. they are take care of their families with what we thought of as kids' jobs. is this a new normal? >> the hope is as the economy improves and was get higher demand as companies see a need to take on more workers they will do that and it will open up the lower entry level jobs for the people who have typically had them. the great recession caused a lot o
the jobs front about a divide in the u.s. economy: the labor market seems to be getting stronger once again. yet for many on the lower end of the income ladder, the big gap in wages is sparking a budding movement. we begin with economics correspondent paul solman on the unemployment rate's drop to a five-year low, even as many jobless americans face more difficult times ahead. the story is part of paul's coverage on making sense of financial news. >> reporter: the latest snapshot of the nation's jobs situation-- showing 203,000 positions added in november, and a jobless rate of 7% was even rosier than anticipated. we asked northeastern university economist barry bluestone what he made of the numbers. >> on balance this was a good report today. over 200,000 people are back to work. we've brought the unemployment rate down from 7.3% to 7%. that's all good news. of course many of those were federal employees coming back to work after furlough, but we had some good news about manufacturing employment, construction employment, pretty much across the board. so in general this is good news plus o
of detroit's economy sold more cars than expected in november. but can the pace of sales continue into the new year? >> and falling behind, american students are lagging other nations in reading, math and science. what changes need to be made to ensure future generations can compete in a global economy? we have that and more tonight on "nightly business report" for this tuesday, december 3rd. >>> good evening everyone and welcome. i'm tyler mathisen. remember how great the month november was for stock investors, records and consecutive weeks of gains? hold that thought because so far december has gone the other way. fast. in fact, the dow and s&p 500 today ended lower for a third straight session. logging their biggest three-day decline in two months. some on wall street say stock prices are too high and they are taking profits and there is a pull back and this is the start of it, or maybe consumer spending, soggy so far this holiday season or the fed's seeing the blowout auto sales? we'll start pairing back on stimulus soon. whatever the reason the market sold off again today. th
in the economy. the first phase in talks has led to economic successes. >> israeli president was asked if he would be willing to meet with rouhani. >> why not? i don't have enemies. we don't consider iran as an enemy. >> yesterday president obama down played expectations of a bigger long-term deal with iran regarding its nuclear program but says negotiations are worth the effort. >> we have to not constantly assume that it's not possible for iran, like any country, to change over time. i wouldn't say it is more than 50/50 but we have to try. >> neighboring iraq today there was another series of fatal bombings. authorities say at least 45 people were killed and dozens wounded after a series of explosions. the violence is worse than at any time since 2006 when the country was on the verge of civil war. >>> in ukraine today protesters topples and beheaded a statue part of a much largerer demonstration. they are demanding that the government move ahead with a deal to deepen ties to the west. the plan angered russia to the east. >>> back in this country the huge storm that caused major power outa
funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and the william and flora hewlett foundation, working to solve social and environmental problems at home and around the world. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: nelson mandela's death was formally announced late today by south africa's current president jacob zuma. he expressed the country's love and sense of loss for their iconic leader, often referred to, out of respect, by his clan name, madiba. >> our beloved mandela, thefounr democratic nation, has departed. he passed on peacefully, in the company of his family, around 2050, on the 5th of december, 2013. he is now resting. he is now at peace. is our nation has lost -- our nation has lost its greatest son. our people have lost a father. although we knew that this day would come, nothing can diminish our sen
says a pay hikeq woud mean spending more money in the community and boosting thekomy economy. cupÑi of okqnoodles. and basically i will be able to provide for my daughter which is very important for me.xdxdw3 having that kidÑi happy, notçó 3 "oh, mommy, can i have jfthese,r money. sure, honesÑ when it( have mone you can have anything you want.( áqat will be what i willt( do. >> that's guadalupe's statement. ron, i want to begin with you. you're the au!y?iÑi of a new ballot initiative to raisefá california's minimum wage to %ò& an hour, lower than the $15xdq t guadalupe andÑi her fellow fast food workers are asking for. what did you think of her story? >> well, i think it's a very realistic account of the day-to-day lives of so many of the low-wage workers in struggling under very difficult positions. and they don't have the dollar) to spend in our economy to revive us after this recession. >> and ken jacobs, do you think that the minimum wage should be raised to $15 an hour? what effectjf would that qhave? >> well, i think california does need a raise÷njf in the minimum w
in the economy and the growth in the economy will take care of all the problems that stan is worried about. >> okay, so, a, it won't take care of all the problems i'm talking about. b, i'm very sympathetic -- >> rose: i'm simplifying that a little bit. >> i'm sympathetic to what larry is saying, who i consider a friend. i hate to get too number-y here, stock? so 40 years ago -- and this is an argument larry would be very sympathetic to. 40 years ago we spent 32% of federal outlays on investment, government investment. that would include things like infrastructure, education, r&d. >> rose: science exploration. >> rose: and we spent about 30% on transfer payments to the elderly. >> we now spend 68% on transfer payments but investments are down to 15%. so i think to larry's point, what did we get out of the investment? well, we got the internet. we got g.p.s., we got the human genome. >> rose: so that's where you agree with him. >> i totally agree. and if you look at the sequester -- >> rose: that the investments are worthwhile and important and crucial to our future. >> yes, but we are cutti
for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> the william and flora hewlett foundation, working to solve social and environmental problems at home and around the world. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: the president sought to shift the focus today, away from what's gone wrong with implementing the health care law to what's gone right. he said the benefits are being overlooked amid problems with the web site and policy cancellations. but insurers still warn they're getting unusable data. we'll have a full report on the president's new p.r. push right after the news summary. >> the university of notre dame over the healthcare law's mandate to cover birth control for students and employees. school officials went to court today arguing they are being forced to violate roman catholic teachings, a federal judge
the protests could damage the nation's economy, particularly its $6 billion a year tourism industry. >>> it was a day of mourning in scotland today, a day after a police helicopter crashed into a pub, killing at least eight people. our british partner itv reports from glasgow. >> across scotland, people paid their respects today. a minute silence was held before the scottish cup match with celtic. ♪ and a special service was held at glasgow cathedral, just a few hundred yards from the street of the cash. the police chaplain has been supporting bereaved officers and those who have worked long, difficult hours here. >> we have seen the courage of glasgow. we've seen the sadness. and then we'll see that drive and that passion and that life and that humor come back to the force. >> with all real hope of rescue now gone, a recovery operation is underway at the bar in glasgow. piece by careful piece, the wreckage of the police helicopter is being removed, but it's a delicate process. much of the building has collapsed and bodies still lie inside. bandaged and bruised, gary was inside th
are ringing and merchants are singing online and in the mall, but how's the economy really doing this holiday season? jeffrey brown explores that question. >> brown: 131 million americans- - more than a third of the country-- are expected to shop online before this day is out. that's according to the national retail federation. and brad wilson at the coupon site bradsdeals.com, says a lot is riding on that prediction. >> this day is the single largest e-commerce day all year round. it's so important for the retailers to be competitive. >> brown: in fact, holiday cyber shopping is already well under way. the analytic firm com-score says online sales for thanksgiving weekend were up 17% from last year, helped by greater use of mobile devices. at the same time, the retail federation estimates that total spending over the weekend, including brick-and-mortar stores, was actually down nearly 3% from last year. a record 141 million people went shopping, but the average shopper spent nearly 4% less than a year ago, partly due to deep discounts. some big retailers-- wal-mart and macy's, for example--
and make a difference to our economy and to our nation. >> are they making a choice to ignore liberal arts or to move away from liberal arts or traditionally-- majors, i guess, that women have traditionally pursued in favor of stem? >> well, i think that, let me begin by saying that spellman college-- spelman college is in many ways a traditional liberal arts college in that we emphasize the skills that come from a strong liberal arts education. critical thinking, problem-solving, quantitative reasoning, communication skills. but certainly a third of our students come with an interest in moving into science. they may be thinking about health careers, initially. but once they start to explore biology, chemistry, physics, computer science, engineering, they see a wider range of options. and i think that's one of the things about spelman, that when they come to spelman they are exposed to faculty who represent a very diverse group of faculty, men and women, 52% of our stem faculty are women. a third of them are women of color. so that they're a broad range of role models and they see that the
on over 4300 stocks. learn more at the street.com/nbr. >>> growing stronger, the u.s. economy grows at its fastest pace since early 2012, but is the 3.6% rate as strong as it appears? and why do american businesses still seem so hesitant? >> protests over pay. fast food workers strike in the biggest push yet for higher wages. they want $15 an hour. they average around $9 now. what a big raise would mean for
and good night. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy at carnegie.org. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> this is bbc world news america. funding of this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation. knewman's own foundation giving charity and o pursuing the common good for over 30 years and union bank. >> this is bbc world news america reporting from washington. biden gets a warm welcome in beijing, but he doesn't get on a to back down territorial dispute. relations tonight are tense. >>> hundreds of thousands of people are running away from central african repu
Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)